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the cold war in the post cold war the philippines and australia in particular to bear some of the burden. that's what i mean by an empire. i'm going to let the audience discover for your questions with the major conclusion of the book is the latest want to ask you before we turn it over what you -- you are walking away from america's historical a central role of the superpower, and you are talking about inevitable, necessary, a decline, and how would you respond. they want the american influence to extend long into the decade that they cannot do that bearing the same level of burden. of vladimir putin against china at the same time that what countries like vietnam and the philippines drag us into a war with china, over the sea is so azoff plater balancing triet in any case, the u.s. has so much oil deposits in texas, louisiana, oklahoma or other places i can name but we are doing to be -- because of energy reserves we are going to be a significant power for decades to come in any case, now is to get allies and others like minded to do more. >> this book has on the cover a blurb from henr
, the philippine-american war. but -- spanish american war and ended up in 2012. but we started in the series now. the book two years into the series, we decided, this is getting very serious, and we know i'm going to be called on this because of my background and making movies. going to say this is part fiction, part fantasy, but we decided to go with this book, and it -- peter took over the book. i was running the film, and we were cross-speaking all the time and checking each other constantly. i took about four and a half, five years now, and that where we are today. >> want to add to that? >> we've been friends for that whole period, since 1996. and then we decided we were going to go ahead with this project, and i thought we could do it in that year, a 60-minute documentary. i went to see oliver in new york two week later, and a ten-hour series, what i thought would take one semester and took four and a half years. so it's been a big project. it was important for us to have the book. i was suppressed how little information you can convey in a 60-minute documentary. so the book, it was an 800
nation. our top story as we go around the world in 80 seconds. philippines. rivers overflowing their banks. flooding roads in the central part of the nation. three people from one family reportedly killed when a tree fell on their house. thousands of people evacuated to temporary shelters. the storm comes three weeks after a huge typhoon devastated the south, killing more than a thousand people. >>> peru. torrential rain flooding the central amazon, driving hundreds of families out of their homes to higher grounds. the raging water uprooting trees and stranding vehicles. please and locals forming a human chain to rescue people from a flooded road. >>> nicnicaragua. government officials ordering people within a two mile radius to prepare to leave. the same volodymyr erup volcand earlier this year. >>> china. a huge fish tank holding sharks burst wide open at a shopping mall. security video capturing the moment the glass broke. saturdays of glass covering some shoppers. local media reporting several people with injuries from cuts to a broken leg. some of those lem on sharks, fish
, the philippines in asia. where these forces working with the philippines and colombians over number of years were able to really address those security threats successfully. i think there's a large consensus forming in a special operations community that is the wave of the future. rather than ask for more money, the things they would need to really improve and perfect this capability can be done with a shifting of some resources internally and that requires -- and not require huge expenditures. the key is working through these other forces. it has been tried to some degree in places like pakistan, yemen, in afghanistan, there's a big effort over the last couple years training village defense forces. there also train afghan special forces and working with special police units. so that is all getting afghans ready to secure their own country. host: back to the peace from foreign affairs because you have quoted a key player in all this, retired army general stanley mcchrystal in which he talks about drones and special operations, which moved the speed of war. can you eexplain? guest: that phrase he
in prison. and at least 418 people in the philippines are dead in the wake of a powerful typhoon. hundreds more are missing and a quarter of a million people now homeless. survivors are in desperate need of water, food and shelter. the storm hit a southern island of the philippines where typhoons are not expected. and at least four people are dead and seven others missing after two ships collided off the coast of the netherlands. rescuers have called off the search for missing crew members. passing ships are being asked to be on the look out. officials say a container vessel collided with a car carrier in the north sea. the nationality of the crew is not yet known. and john travolta and olivia newton-john, they are back together again. yes, 34 years after "grease" the two are dropping an original single from their holiday album this christmas. it's called, i think you might like it. ♪ ♪ i can't help smiling >> i kind of like that. looks a little familiar there, doesn't it? just a bit. some of these moves look familiar. that's because the song was penned by the same person who wrote "yo
countries like bangladesh and the philippines and charged exorbitant fees to travel to their work sites often misled about where they're going, what that are salaries will be and what their living conditions will be like. frequently their passports are confiscated so they cannot in fact return home, even if they're able to scrape together the money to make that journey. this kind of human trafficking is no less than modern-day slavery, subsidized by our government with taxpayer money. it's reprehensible. but for me, the number-one issue here is the safety of our american troops on these bases. that safety is compromised if our bases are filled with unauthorized, potentially unsafe foreign workers. and that's why i introduced the end trafficking in government contracting act of treft which provides the -- of 2012 which provides the most comprehensive approach taken. it is bipartisan legislation which now is included in the bill which passed the senate last week and i'm hopeful will be retained in conference and signed into law soon, with strong bipartisan support from my colleague, senat
the first filipina judge, man or woman, to sit on the federal bench. so the great nation of the philippines, which contributes so many immigrants and then citizens to our country, can be very proud that miss schofield has risen to this high post once she's confirmed. in conclusion, i believe she'll make a terrific judge and i look forward to her nomination -- confirmation today. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? mr. cornyn: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from texas. mr. cornyn: mr. president, can you tell me how much time is remaining on this side? the presiding officer: 15 minutes. mr. cornyn: thank you. mr. president, it's become disturbingly clear that president obama doesn't mind whether or not we drive off the fiscal cliff. just last week, his own treasury secretary, secretary geithner, said the white house was -- quote -- "absolutely" prepared to go off the cliff unless republicans agree to raise marginal tax rates. in other words, during a period of high unemployment -- the highest since the great depression -- the president
, and it stands as an amazing legacy. but i will always remember the work we did on the philippines. your efforts on the floor, you've always had this amazing humility and sense of purpose in finding the common ground and reaching out to people on both sides of the i'm. every member of the committee has joined in presenting you with a resolution, and i just want to read just the introduction. whereas throughout his 36 years in the united states senate richard hue garre has served indiana, the united states with grace, distinction and tenacity and will have many more contributions to a nation still he reveres and that reveres him. and we want to present this to you, everybody on the committee, my friend. [applause] >> mr. chairman, i thank you very much. i'm very grateful to have had this opportunity to serve with each one of you. thank you. it's a very special tribute. >> thank you, sir. well, it's small compare today your service, but we honor you. and then, finally, we're also going to be losing jim webb and jim demint. jim, as we all know, jim webb came here, did something very few freshmen ca
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)